Women in the shrimp farming industry

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The World Bank predicts that the aquaculture industry will be the world’s main source of seafood by 2030. In addition to providing protein for people around the world, the aquaculture industry provides thousands of jobs for local communities. This is especially important in developing countries.

According to the FAO, women make up 70% of the workforce in the aquaculture industry. That’s a fantastic statistic, isn’t it? Women in the aquaculture industry are involved in a wide range of activities, from production to processing, retail, and trade.

The FAO report shows that women deserve much attention and importance as essential contributors in various sectors of the industry. However, they are paid less than the amount and value of their work, and most have little access to resources and opportunities.

FAO’s report demonstrates that women deserve much attention and importance because they are essential contributors in different sectors of these industries. However, most of them have little access to resources and opportunities and are paid less than the amount and value of their work.

The need for gender equality is widely felt as the importance of the aquaculture industry in the world is increasing day by day and women are heavily involved in this industry.

The discussion of gender inequality in the aquaculture industry is not exclusive to developing countries. This inequality is also observed in developed countries and at international levels. As you move towards higher positions and positions in this industry, the number of women decreases.

The discussion on gender inequality in aquaculture is not limited to developing countries. This inequality is also observed in developed countries and at the international level. As you move to higher positions and levels in the industry, the number of women decreases. For a growing and influential industry like aquaculture, this is a serious and important issue.

The role of women in the shrimp farming industry

The shrimp farming industry first emerged in East Asian countries. The primitive shrimp farms were managed in a traditional family manner and women participated with men in the breeding process. This cooperation and participation of women in the development of shrimp farming continues and is gradually increasing.

Currently, women play an active role in shrimp farming, from production to processing, packaging, trading, and sales.

In countries such as Thailand, Bangladesh, Vietnam, and India, women are the primary workers in the shrimp farming industry.

Statistics show that approximately 70% of the shrimp farming workforce in Thailand is female. In Vietnam, 50% of the workers in the shrimp farming industry are women.

Women in the shrimp farming industry work in areas such as breeding, feed production, packaging, and transportation. These female workers are very valuable in this industry because of their special skills such as high accuracy, ability to work under difficult conditions, and ability to work in a team.

Women are also active in the shrimp processing sector. Women make up a large percentage of the workforce in processing plants, and this sector has grown significantly due to the increased demand for value-added products.

In recent decades, the number of women working in the industry’s specialized fields has increased. However, there has been a noticeable lack of women in leadership positions.

Women in this industry deserve better.

What are the problems and constraints faced by women in shrimp farming?

As noted above, women make up a significant percentage of the workforce in the shrimp farming industry, but a large number of them work in low-ranking and low-paid positions. In Bangladesh, for example, about 80% of workers in processing plants are women, but women make up less than 1% of managers.

Gendered barriers and working conditions combine to impose many physical and social costs on women.

In the factories, women work standing up, in long shifts, and in very low temperatures. The lack of sanitary facilities is also evident in most factories.

The roles assigned to women are considered low level and most of them cannot be promoted to higher positions.

Lack of confidence in women’s abilities in leadership roles is another problem that prevents them from advancing in their field of work.

Women are paid less than their male counterparts for similar work.

These problems multiply by adding the role of wife and mother to women; When, according to the beliefs and customs of most societies, women are expected to perform household roles such as cooking, cleaning, and taking care of children in addition to their job duties.

These problems are compounded by women’s roles as wives and mothers. According to the beliefs and customs of most societies, women are expected to perform domestic tasks such as cooking, cleaning, and caring for children in addition to their professional duties.

These factors cause both physical and mental harm to the women who work in the industry.

These are just some of the problems faced by women in shrimp farming. There is no doubt that if we listen to the women themselves, they have a lot to say.

The term “glass ceiling,” used to describe the barriers to women’s advancement, indicates the existence of inequality in organizations and industries, and it is clearly visible in the shrimp farming industry.

WSI Organization, supporting women in the aquaculture industry

The International Organization for Women in the Seafood Industry, abbreviated as WSI, is a non-profit organization founded by aquaculture industry activists and gender specialists.

Its members believe that women are essential contributors to the aquaculture industry but are being overlooked and their stories, good and bad, are not being told.

There is a great need to raise awareness of the role of women in this industry and to believe in their value.

WSI’s goal is to make aquaculture a non-discriminatory and gender-equal industry in the world, where men and women have equal opportunities to build a sustainable industry.

What should we do?

In recent years, workers’ rights organizations, in collaboration with women’s rights activists, have tried to improve the conditions of women in the industry by putting pressure on various sectors of the industry.

To improve and enhance the conditions of women working in the shrimp farming industry, solutions have been offered that include:

– Investing in raising awareness of gender equality

– Equitable distribution of tasks in the work environment

– Equal wages and facilities

– Facilitating women’s advancement and achievement in leadership positions

Implementing these solutions and making changes will take time, but there are clear prospects for reducing inequality.

In today’s world, as all societies strive to achieve development and overcome economic, political, and social crises, the use of all existing human capacities and the full participation of women play an important role.

In today’s world, societies that utilize the talents and capacities of their human resources, regardless of gender, continue to grow and develop.

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